computers vs. people

Martin Wittmann's blog on User Experience and Web Technology

Today I wrote some crappy code (and I'm fine with that)

This is not an article about a new, intelligent solution to a common technological problem. Neither is this a post how I used best practices to create code that is easily maintainable, reusable code.

Rather this is the story of a little project I wrote for myself during which I left out anything that did not directly lead me to a usable product.

My first project: myWishli.st is online

My first project myWishlist went online today, here's my story...

I'm a fan of lists. I write and update lists multiple times per week. And though I love putting stuff on paper very often I loose them, throw them away or in one way or another get rid of them.

Listing things gives me a feeling of control over things that happen (or should happen) around me. Without lists I'm a bit lost, tend to forget what I have to do, what I will have to do in the next days and so on.

Empathy is Key

Let's face it, we want more: More readers, more users, more signups, more app downloads, more page views,... more sales.

Guessing anticipating which problems users have when they use software may help us to get a step closer to our goals and make our users happier.

This is a list of little concerns I think many users experience when using websites. Ok, most of them are little fears I experienced myself, but don't tell anyone!

Why font size does not (really) relate to how big it is

While designing this blog and for the first time applying worshipping vertical rhythm I came to the point where I wished I knew how big a font would be displayed given a specific font size.

So I set out to find out which part of my 15px Verdana is actually 15px in width or height. The only problem was that I could't find any part because there was none.